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Iron

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Dietary Iron

Aka: Dietary Iron
  1. See Also
    1. Iron Supplementation
    2. Iron
  2. Background
    1. See Iron Supplementation for pediatric requirements
    2. Typical iron adult intake: 15-18 g/day
    3. Typical iron absorption: 1.5 to 1.8 mg/day
      1. Only 5-10% of Dietary Iron is typically absorbed
      2. Absorption may increase to 15-50% in Iron Deficiency
  3. Indications
    1. Iron Deficiency Anemia
    2. Increased requirements in menstruating women
  4. Complications
    1. Excessive iron intake may result in Hemochromatosis
  5. Preparations: Sources
    1. Heme-Iron (Better absorption by 2-3 fold)
      1. Liver
      2. Red meats
        1. Cooked beef (3 oz): 2.5 mg elemental iron
      3. Poultry
        1. Turkey or chicken (3 oz dark meat): 1.1 to 2.0 mg elemental iron
      4. Fish
    2. Non-Heme Iron
      1. Soybeans (0.5 cups cooked): 4.4 mg elemental iron
      2. Lentils (0.5 cups cooked): 3.3 mg elemental iron
      3. Spinach (0.5 cups cooked): 3.2 mg elemental iron
      4. Beans (0.5 cups cooked Kidney, lima, navy pinto): 1.8 to 2.2 elemental iron
      5. Apricots
      6. Peaches
      7. Prunes
      8. Apples
      9. Grapes
      10. Raisins
      11. Eggs
      12. Iron fortified foods
        1. Fortified breakfast cereals: 18 mg elemental iron per serving
    3. Baby Foods
      1. Brown rice cereal or oatmeal cereal (1 tbsp dry): 1.6 to 1.8 mg elemental iron
      2. Green Beans (6 oz): 1.8 mg elemental iron
      3. Lamb or Chicken: 1.2 mg in 2.5 oz baby food
      4. Peas (3.4 oz): 0.9 mg elemental iron
  6. Food Interactions
    1. See Iron Supplementation
    2. Enhancers of iron absorption
      1. Heme iron (see above)
      2. Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)
    3. Inhibitors of iron absorption
      1. Polyphenol (in vegetables)
      2. Tannins (in tea)
      3. Phytate (in bran, cereal)
      4. Calcium (dairy products)
      5. Antacids (eg. Proton Pump Inhibitors, Maalox, Zantac)
  7. Resources
    1. NIH Iron Fact Sheet
      1. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iron-HealthProfessional/
  8. References
    1. Baker (2010) Pediatrics 126(5): 1040-50 [PubMed]

Dietary Iron (C0376520)

Definition (NCI_CRCH) Forms of the element iron found in foods.
Definition (MSH) Iron or iron compounds used in foods or as food. Dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase. Insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.
Definition (CSP) iron or iron compounds in foods; dietary iron is important in oxygen transport and the synthesis of the iron-porphyrin proteins hemoglobin, myoglobin, cytochromes, and cytochrome oxidase; insufficient amounts of dietary iron can lead to iron-deficiency anemia.
Concepts Inorganic Chemical (T197)
MSH D019266
English Iron, Dietary, Dietary Iron, Iron, Dietary [Chemical/Ingredient], dietary iron, iron dietary, Fe, Iron
Swedish Järn i kosten
Czech železo dietní
Finnish Ravinnon rauta
Russian ZHELEZO V PITANII, ЖЕЛЕЗО В ПИТАНИИ
Croatian ŽELJEZO, PREHRAMBENO
Polish Żelazo w pokarmach
Japanese 食品中の鉄, 食餌性鉄, 食用鉄分, 鉄-食品, 食品中の鉄成分
French Fer alimentaire
German Eisen, Nahrungs-, Nahrungs-Eisen
Italian Ferro alimentare
Portuguese Ferro na Dieta
Spanish Hierro en la Dieta, Hierro Dietético
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


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