Orthopedics Book

SC

  • SC Dislocation

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SC Dislocation

Aka: SC Dislocation, Sternoclavicular Dislocation, SC Separation, Sternoclavicular Separation
  1. Epidemiology
    1. Uncommon injury
  2. Mechanism
    1. High impact direct blow to chest (e.g. MVA)
      1. Results in posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
    2. Fall onto lateral Shoulder with compression
      1. Causes either anterior or posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
  3. Types: Sternoclavicular Dislocation
    1. Anterior Dislocation (More common)
      1. Routine oupatient management
      2. May occasionally occur spontaneously without Trauma
        1. Older adult presents with painless sternal mass
        2. Affects sternal end of clavicle
    2. Posterior Dislocation (uncommon)
      1. Requires emergent Consultation for reduction
      2. High risk for underlying structure (Great Vessel, trachea, esophagus) injury (30% of cases)
        1. Leads to Dyspnea and vascular compression
  4. Differential Diagnosis
    1. Epiphyseal Fracture in child
      1. Non-surgical management as with SC Dislocation
  5. Findings: Symptoms and Signs
    1. Anterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
      1. Tender, visible prominence at sternoclavicular Joint
      2. Sternoclavicular pain with any Shoulder Range of Motion
    2. Posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
      1. May be occult injury or divit seen at SC joint
      2. Underlying mediastinal injury may present in various ways
        1. Dyspnea or hoarse voice (tracheal injury)
        2. Neurologic or vascular deficits (Great Vessel injury)
        3. Dysphagia (esophageal injury)
  6. Imaging
    1. Anterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
      1. Sternoclavicular XRay
        1. SC Joint difficult to visualize on XRay
        2. View angled upward including uninjured side helpful
      2. Sternoclavicular joint MRI may be necessary
        1. Physeal Fracture of medial clavicle may also occur and may be occult
          1. Clavicle physis is last in the body to fuse (age 23-25 years)
    2. Posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
      1. Chest XRay is often normal
      2. Serendipity View XRay (oblique view of SC)
        1. Patient lies supine on bed
        2. Xray angled 40 degrees toward manubrium
        3. Allows for visualization of both sternoclavicular joints
      3. CT Chest with contrast (or MRI)
        1. Definitive and preferred imaging modality
  7. Management: Anterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
    1. Reduction by traction and manipulation
      1. Reduction difficult to maintain
      2. Commonly recurs
      3. No loss of function (cosmetic only)
    2. Surgery (rarely indicated)
      1. Indicated for post-Traumatic Arthritis
      2. Excise medial 1 to 2 cm of clavicle
  8. Management: Posterior Sternoclavicular Dislocation
    1. Emergent Consultation
      1. Orthopedics
      2. Cardiothoracic surgery
    2. Emergent reduction technique
      1. Indicated for pulseless extremity and orthopedics not immediately available
      2. Perform under Procedural Sedation
      3. Patient supine with towel roll between Scapulae
      4. Extend and abduct the affected arm while another provider applies counter-traction
        1. May also attempt to concurrently pull medial clavicle anteriorly
  9. References
    1. Jhun and Roepke in Herbert (2015) EM:Rap 15(11): 10-11

Dislocation of sternoclavicular joint (C0347729)

Concepts Injury or Poisoning (T037)
ICD10 S43.2
SnomedCT 263009006
English Disloc sternoclav joint, dislocation of sternoclavicular joint, dislocation of sternoclavicular joint (physical finding), dislocation of sternoclavicular joint (diagnosis), sternoclavicular joint dislocation, Dislocation of sternoclavicular joint, Dislocation of sternoclavicular joint (disorder), dislocation; sternoclavicular, sternoclavicular; dislocation
German Luxation des Sternoklavikulargelenkes
Korean 복장빗장관절의 탈구
Dutch luxatie; sternoclaviculair, sternoclaviculair; luxatie, Luxatie van sternoclaviculair gewricht
Spanish luxación de articulación esternoclavicular (trastorno), luxación de articulación esternoclavicular
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


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