Orthopedics Book

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Ankle Anatomy

Aka: Ankle Anatomy, Ankle, Ankle Joint
  1. See Also
    1. Ankle Exam
    2. Hip Anatomy
    3. Knee Anatomy
    4. Foot Anatomy
    5. Thigh Anatomy
    6. Musculoskeletal Anatomy
    7. Neuroanatomy of the Leg
  2. Anatomy: Joint
    1. Ankle Joint is broader anteriorly
    2. Ankle Joint is formed from a ring of bone and ligament
      1. The ring is relatively stable when disrupted in one location
      2. Disruption of the ankle ring in more than one location results in instability that typically requires surgical management
    3. Maximal stability with ankle dorsiflexed (Neutral)
    4. Unstable in plantar flexion (e.g. High heel shoes)
      1. Risk of chronic ankle and calf pain
    5. Images: Structure
      1. orthoLegAnkleXsGrayBB357.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      2. AnkleAnatomyTalarJoint.jpg
      3. AnkleAnatomySubtalarFunction.jpg
    6. Images: Function
      1. AnkleAnatomyFlexion.jpg
      2. AnkleAnatomyFunctionFlexionAndExtension.jpg
  3. Anatomy: Bones
    1. Medial and lateral malleoli function (with ligaments)
      1. Grasp talus in a Tongue and groove type joint
      2. Prevent talus medial and lateral displacement
      3. Allows for ankle plantar flexion and dorsiflexion
    2. Images
      1. orthoAnteriorBoneFoot.jpgAlso available as a Poster size image. See printing instructions and image restrictions.
      2. orthoPosteriorBoneFoot.jpgAlso available as a Poster size image. See printing instructions and image restrictions.
      3. AnkleLateralAnatomy.gif
  4. Anatomy: Ligaments
    1. Lateral Ligaments (torn in Lateral Ankle Sprain)
      1. Anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL)
      2. Posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL)
      3. Calcaneal fibular ligament (CFL)
    2. Medial Ligaments (torn in Medial Ankle Sprain)
      1. Deltoid ligament complex (strong, wide ligament is much less frequently torn than the lateral ligaments)
    3. Interosseous ligament (torn in Syndesmotic Sprain or High Ankle Sprain)
      1. Membrane between the tibia and fibula (Syndesmotic ligament)
    4. Images
      1. orthoLegAnkleLatLigamentsGrayBB356.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      2. orthoLegAnklePostLigamentsGrayBB358.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      3. AnkleAnatomyLigaments.jpg
  5. Anatomy: Tendons
    1. Medial Tendons Mnemonic (Tom, Dick and Harry)
      1. Medial Malleolus (Anterior Bony Landmark)
      2. Tibialis Posterior Tendon (Tom)
      3. Flexor Digitorum Longus Tendon (Dick)
      4. Posterior Tibial Artery
      5. Posterior Tibial Vein
      6. Tibial Nerve
      7. Flexor Hallucis Longus Tendon (Harry)
      8. Calcaneus (Posterior Bony Landmark)
    2. Images
      1. orthoLegAnkleTendonsLateralGrayBB441.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      2. orthoLegAnkleTendonsMedialGrayBB442.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      3. orthoLegAnkleTendonLateralGrayBB1241.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)
      4. orthoLegAnkleTendonMedialGrayBB1242.gifLewis (1918) Gray's Anatomy 20th ed (in public domain at Yahoo or BartleBy)

Ankle joint structure (C0003087)

Definition (NCI) A gliding joint between the distal ends of the tibia and fibula and the proximal end of the talus.
Definition (NCI_CDISC) A gliding joint between the distal ends of the tibia and fibula and the proximal end of the talus. (NCI)
Definition (MSH) The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.
Concepts Body Space or Junction (T030)
MSH D000843
SnomedCT 70258002
English Ankle Joint, Ankle Joints, Joint, Ankle, Joints, Ankle, Talocrural joint, Ankle, Articulatio talocruralis, ankle joints, talocrural joint, ankle joint, ankles joints, hock joint, Inferior Tibiofibular Joint, Joint, Inferior Tibiofibular, Joints, Inferior Tibiofibular, Tibiofibular Joint, Inferior, Tibiofibular Joints, Inferior, Inferior Tibiofibular Joints, Hock joint, Tarsal joint, Tarsus, ANKLE JOINT, Ankle joint, Ankle joint structure (body structure), Ankle joint structure, Ankle joint, NOS, Hock of joint, NOS, Hock joint, NOS
French Articulatio talocruralis, Articulation de la cheville, Articulation talocrurale, Articulation du cou-de-pied, Articulation talo-crurale, Articulation tibio-astragalienne, Articulation tibio-tarsienne, Articulation tibioastragalienne, Articulation tibiotarsienne
Swedish Fotled
Czech hlezenní kloub
Finnish Ylempi nilkkanivel
Italian Articulatio talocruralis, Articolazione della caviglia
Russian GOLENOSTOPNYI SUSTAV, ГОЛЕНОСТОПНЫЙ СУСТАВ
Croatian GLEŽANJ, ZGLOB
Polish Staw skokowo-goleniowy
Japanese 距腿関節, 足関節, くるぶし関節
Norwegian Talocruralledd, Articulatio talocruralis, Ankelledd
Spanish articulación del tobillo, articulación tibiotarsiana, estructura de la articulación del tobillo (estructura corporal), estructura de la articulación del tobillo, Articulación del Tobillo
German Sprunggelenk
Dutch Enkelgewricht
Portuguese Articulação do Tornozelo
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


Ankle Injuries and Disorders (C1456866)

Definition (MEDLINEPLUS)

Your ankle bone and the ends of your two lower leg bones make up the ankle joint. Your ligaments, which connect bones to one another, stabilize and support it. Your muscles and tendons move it.

The most common ankle problems are sprains and fractures. A sprain is an injury to the ligaments. It may take a few weeks to many months to heal completely. A fracture is a break in a bone. You can also injure other parts of the ankle such as tendons, which join muscles to bone, and cartilage, which cushions your joints. Ankle sprains and fractures are common sports injuries.

Concepts Disease or Syndrome (T047)
English Ankle Injuries and Disorders
Sources
Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified Medical Language System)


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